The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center


The NSA is building an enormous spy center, probably the biggest ever, in Bluffdale Utah. When construction is completed in 2013, the heavily fortified $2 billion facility will encompass 1 million square feet, including four 25,000-square-foot areas to house endless rows of high-powered servers. The center will be fed data collected by the agency’s eavesdropping satellites, overseas listening posts, and secret monitoring rooms in telecom facilities throughout the US.

The incredible processing power of this facility will be used to scan e-mails, phone calls, text messages, tweets or any other kind of communication. As a former NSA officer states in his article, while holding his thumb and forefinger close together “We are that far from a turnkey totalitarian state.” Here’s an article from Wired about this massive facility.


The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center (Watch What You Say)

The spring air in the small, sand-dusted town has a soft haze to it, and clumps of green-gray sagebrush rustle in the breeze. Bluffdale sits in a bowl-shaped valley in the shadow of Utah’s Wasatch Range to the east and the Oquirrh Mountains to the west. It’s the heart of Mormon country, where religious pioneers first arrived more than 160 years ago. They came to escape the rest of the world, to understand the mysterious words sent down from their god as revealed on buried golden plates, and to practice what has become known as “the principle,” marriage to multiple wives.

Today Bluffdale is home to one of the nation’s largest sects of polygamists, the Apostolic United Brethren, with upwards of 9,000 members. The brethren’s complex includes a chapel, a school, a sports field, and an archive. Membership has doubled since 1978—and the number of plural marriages has tripled—so the sect has recently been looking for ways to purchase more land and expand throughout the town.

But new pioneers have quietly begun moving into the area, secretive outsiders who say little and keep to themselves. Like the pious polygamists, they are focused on deciphering cryptic messages that only they have the power to understand. Just off Beef Hollow Road, less than a mile from brethren headquarters, thousands of hard-hatted construction workers in sweat-soaked T-shirts are laying the groundwork for the newcomers’ own temple and archive, a massive complex so large that it necessitated expanding the town’s boundaries. Once built, it will be more than five times the size of the US Capitol.

Rather than Bibles, prophets, and worshippers, this temple will be filled with servers, computer intelligence experts, and armed guards. And instead of listening for words flowing down from heaven, these newcomers will be secretly capturing, storing, and analyzing vast quantities of words and images hurtling through the world’s telecommunications networks. In the little town of Bluffdale, Big Love and Big Brother have become uneasy neighbors.

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration—an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans’ privacy.

But “this is more than just a data center,” says one senior intelligence official who until recently was involved with the program. The mammoth Bluffdale center will have another important and far more secret role that until now has gone unrevealed. It is also critical, he says, for breaking codes. And code-breaking is crucial, because much of the data that the center will handle—financial information, stock transactions, business deals, foreign military and diplomatic secrets, legal documents, confidential personal communications—will be heavily encrypted. According to another top official also involved with the program, the NSA made an enormous breakthrough several years ago in its ability to cryptanalyze, or break, unfathomably complex encryption systems employed by not only governments around the world but also many average computer users in the US. The upshot, according to this official: “Everybody’s a target; everybody with communication is a target.”

For the NSA, overflowing with tens of billions of dollars in post-9/11 budget awards, the cryptanalysis breakthrough came at a time of explosive growth, in size as well as in power. Established as an arm of the Department of Defense following Pearl Harbor, with the primary purpose of preventing another surprise assault, the NSA suffered a series of humiliations in the post-Cold War years. Caught offguard by an escalating series of terrorist attacks—the first World Trade Center bombing, the blowing up of US embassies in East Africa, the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen, and finally the devastation of 9/11—some began questioning the agency’s very reason for being. In response, the NSA has quietly been reborn. And while there is little indication that its actual effectiveness has improved—after all, despite numerous pieces of evidence and intelligence-gathering opportunities, it missed the near-disastrous attempted attacks by the underwear bomber on a flight to Detroit in 2009 and by the car bomber in Times Square in 2010—there is no doubt that it has transformed itself into the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever created.

In the process—and for the first time since Watergate and the other scandals of the Nixon administration—the NSA has turned its surveillance apparatus on the US and its citizens. It has established listening posts throughout the nation to collect and sift through billions of email messages and phone calls, whether they originate within the country or overseas. It has created a supercomputer of almost unimaginable speed to look for patterns and unscramble codes. Finally, the agency has begun building a place to store all the trillions of words and thoughts and whispers captured in its electronic net. And, of course, it’s all being done in secret. To those on the inside, the old adage that NSA stands for Never Say Anything applies more than ever.

A swath of freezing fog blanketed Salt Lake City on the morning of January 6, 2011, mixing with a weeklong coating of heavy gray smog. Red air alerts, warning people to stay indoors unless absolutely necessary, had become almost daily occurrences, and the temperature was in the bone-chilling twenties. “What I smell and taste is like coal smoke,” complained one local blogger that day. At the city’s international airport, many inbound flights were delayed or diverted while outbound regional jets were grounded. But among those making it through the icy mist was a figure whose gray suit and tie made him almost disappear into the background. He was tall and thin, with the physique of an aging basketball player and dark caterpillar eyebrows beneath a shock of matching hair. Accompanied by a retinue of bodyguards, the man was NSA deputy director Chris Inglis, the agency’s highest-ranking civilian and the person who ran its worldwide day-to-day operations.

A short time later, Inglis arrived in Bluffdale at the site of the future data center, a flat, unpaved runway on a little-used part of Camp Williams, a National Guard training site. There, in a white tent set up for the occasion, Inglis joined Harvey Davis, the agency’s associate director for installations and logistics, and Utah senator Orrin Hatch, along with a few generals and politicians in a surreal ceremony. Standing in an odd wooden sandbox and holding gold-painted shovels, they made awkward jabs at the sand and thus officially broke ground on what the local media had simply dubbed “the spy center.” Hoping for some details on what was about to be built, reporters turned to one of the invited guests, Lane Beattie of the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. Did he have any idea of the purpose behind the new facility in his backyard? “Absolutely not,” he said with a self-conscious half laugh. “Nor do I want them spying on me.”

For his part, Inglis simply engaged in a bit of double-talk, emphasizing the least threatening aspect of the center: “It’s a state-of-the-art facility designed to support the intelligence community in its mission to, in turn, enable and protect the nation’s cybersecurity.” While cybersecurity will certainly be among the areas focused on in Bluffdale, what is collected, how it’s collected, and what is done with the material are far more important issues. Battling hackers makes for a nice cover—it’s easy to explain, and who could be against it? Then the reporters turned to Hatch, who proudly described the center as “a great tribute to Utah,” then added, “I can’t tell you a lot about what they’re going to be doing, because it’s highly classified.”

And then there was this anomaly: Although this was supposedly the official ground-breaking for the nation’s largest and most expensive cybersecurity project, no one from the Department of Homeland Security, the agency responsible for protecting civilian networks from cyberattack, spoke from the lectern. In fact, the official who’d originally introduced the data center, at a press conference in Salt Lake City in October 2009, had nothing to do with cybersecurity. It was Glenn A. Gaffney, deputy director of national intelligence for collection, a man who had spent almost his entire career at the CIA. As head of collection for the intelligence community, he managed the country’s human and electronic spies.

Within days, the tent and sandbox and gold shovels would be gone and Inglis and the generals would be replaced by some 10,000 construction workers. “We’ve been asked not to talk about the project,” Rob Moore, president of Big-D Construction, one of the three major contractors working on the project, told a local reporter. The plans for the center show an extensive security system: an elaborate $10 million antiterrorism protection program, including a fence designed to stop a 15,000-pound vehicle traveling 50 miles per hour, closed-circuit cameras, a biometric identification system, a vehicle inspection facility, and a visitor-control center.

Inside, the facility will consist of four 25,000-square-foot halls filled with servers, complete with raised floor space for cables and storage. In addition, there will be more than 900,000 square feet for technical support and administration. The entire site will be self-sustaining, with fuel tanks large enough to power the backup generators for three days in an emergency, water storage with the capability of pumping 1.7 million gallons of liquid per day, as well as a sewage system and massive air-conditioning system to keep all those servers cool. Electricity will come from the center’s own substation built by Rocky Mountain Power to satisfy the 65-megawatt power demand. Such a mammoth amount of energy comes with a mammoth price tag—about $40 million a year, according to one estimate.

Given the facility’s scale and the fact that a terabyte of data can now be stored on a flash drive the size of a man’s pinky, the potential amount of information that could be housed in Bluffdale is truly staggering. But so is the exponential growth in the amount of intelligence data being produced every day by the eavesdropping sensors of the NSA and other intelligence agencies. As a result of this “expanding array of theater airborne and other sensor networks,” as a 2007 Department of Defense report puts it, the Pentagon is attempting to expand its worldwide communications network, known as the Global Information Grid, to handle yottabytes (1024 bytes) of data. (A yottabyte is a septillion bytes—so large that no one has yet coined a term for the next higher magnitude.)

It needs that capacity because, according to a recent report by Cisco, global Internet traffic will quadruple from 2010 to 2015, reaching 966 exabytes per year. (A million exabytes equal a yottabyte.) In terms of scale, Eric Schmidt, Google’s former CEO, once estimated that the total of all human knowledge created from the dawn of man to 2003 totaled 5 exabytes. And the data flow shows no sign of slowing. In 2011 more than 2 billion of the world’s 6.9 billion people were connected to the Internet. By 2015, market research firm IDC estimates, there will be 2.7 billion users. Thus, the NSA’s need for a 1-million-square-foot data storehouse. Should the agency ever fill the Utah center with a yottabyte of information, it would be equal to about 500 quintillion (500,000,000,000,000,000,000) pages of text.

The data stored in Bluffdale will naturally go far beyond the world’s billions of public web pages. The NSA is more interested in the so-called invisible web, also known as the deep web or deepnet—data beyond the reach of the public. This includes password-protected data, US and foreign government communications, and noncommercial file-sharing between trusted peers. “The deep web contains government reports, databases, and other sources of information of high value to DOD and the intelligence community,” according to a 2010 Defense Science Board report. “Alternative tools are needed to find and index data in the deep web … Stealing the classified secrets of a potential adversary is where the [intelligence] community is most comfortable.” With its new Utah Data Center, the NSA will at last have the technical capability to store, and rummage through, all those stolen secrets. The question, of course, is how the agency defines who is, and who is not, “a potential adversary.”

Before yottabytes of data from the deep web and elsewhere can begin piling up inside the servers of the NSA’s new center, they must be collected. To better accomplish that, the agency has undergone the largest building boom in its history, including installing secret electronic monitoring rooms in major US telecom facilities. Controlled by the NSA, these highly secured spaces are where the agency taps into the US communications networks, a practice that came to light during the Bush years but was never acknowledged by the agency. The broad outlines of the so-called warrantless-wiretapping program have long been exposed—how the NSA secretly and illegally bypassed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which was supposed to oversee and authorize highly targeted domestic eavesdropping; how the program allowed wholesale monitoring of millions of American phone calls and email. In the wake of the program’s exposure, Congress passed the FISA Amendments Act of 2008, which largely made the practices legal. Telecoms that had agreed to participate in the illegal activity were granted immunity from prosecution and lawsuits. What wasn’t revealed until now, however, was the enormity of this ongoing domestic spying program.

For the first time, a former NSA official has gone on the record to describe the program, codenamed Stellar Wind, in detail. William Binney was a senior NSA crypto-mathematician largely responsible for automating the agency’s worldwide eavesdropping network. A tall man with strands of black hair across the front of his scalp and dark, determined eyes behind thick-rimmed glasses, the 68-year-old spent nearly four decades breaking codes and finding new ways to channel billions of private phone calls and email messages from around the world into the NSA’s bulging databases. As chief and one of the two cofounders of the agency’s Signals Intelligence Automation Research Center, Binney and his team designed much of the infrastructure that’s still likely used to intercept international and foreign communications.

He explains that the agency could have installed its tapping gear at the nation’s cable landing stations—the more than two dozen sites on the periphery of the US where fiber-optic cables come ashore. If it had taken that route, the NSA would have been able to limit its eavesdropping to just international communications, which at the time was all that was allowed under US law. Instead it chose to put the wiretapping rooms at key junction points throughout the country—large, windowless buildings known as switches—thus gaining access to not just international communications but also to most of the domestic traffic flowing through the US. The network of intercept stations goes far beyond the single room in an AT&T building in San Francisco exposed by a whistle-blower in 2006. “I think there’s 10 to 20 of them,” Binney says. “That’s not just San Francisco; they have them in the middle of the country and also on the East Coast.”

The eavesdropping on Americans doesn’t stop at the telecom switches. To capture satellite communications in and out of the US, the agency also monitors AT&T’s powerful earth stations, satellite receivers in locations that include Roaring Creek and Salt Creek. Tucked away on a back road in rural Catawissa, Pennsylvania, Roaring Creek’s three 105-foot dishes handle much of the country’s communications to and from Europe and the Middle East. And on an isolated stretch of land in remote Arbuckle, California, three similar dishes at the company’s Salt Creek station service the Pacific Rim and Asia.

Binney left the NSA in late 2001, shortly after the agency launched its warrantless-wiretapping program. “They violated the Constitution setting it up,” he says bluntly. “But they didn’t care. They were going to do it anyway, and they were going to crucify anyone who stood in the way. When they started violating the Constitution, I couldn’t stay.” Binney says Stellar Wind was far larger than has been publicly disclosed and included not just eavesdropping on domestic phone calls but the inspection of domestic email. At the outset the program recorded 320 million calls a day, he says, which represented about 73 to 80 percent of the total volume of the agency’s worldwide intercepts. The haul only grew from there. According to Binney—who has maintained close contact with agency employees until a few years ago—the taps in the secret rooms dotting the country are actually powered by highly sophisticated software programs that conduct “deep packet inspection,” examining Internet traffic as it passes through the 10-gigabit-per-second cables at the speed of light.

The software, created by a company called Narus that’s now part of Boeing, is controlled remotely from NSA headquarters at Fort Meade in Maryland and searches US sources for target addresses, locations, countries, and phone numbers, as well as watch-listed names, keywords, and phrases in email. Any communication that arouses suspicion, especially those to or from the million or so people on agency watch lists, are automatically copied or recorded and then transmitted to the NSA.

The scope of surveillance expands from there, Binney says. Once a name is entered into the Narus database, all phone calls and other communications to and from that person are automatically routed to the NSA’s recorders. “Anybody you want, route to a recorder,” Binney says. “If your number’s in there? Routed and gets recorded.” He adds, “The Narus device allows you to take it all.” And when Bluffdale is completed, whatever is collected will be routed there for storage and analysis.

According to Binney, one of the deepest secrets of the Stellar Wind program—again, never confirmed until now—was that the NSA gained warrantless access to AT&T’s vast trove of domestic and international billing records, detailed information about who called whom in the US and around the world. As of 2007, AT&T had more than 2.8 trillion records housed in a database at its Florham Park, New Jersey, complex.

Verizon was also part of the program, Binney says, and that greatly expanded the volume of calls subject to the agency’s domestic eavesdropping. “That multiplies the call rate by at least a factor of five,” he says. “So you’re over a billion and a half calls a day.” (Spokespeople for Verizon and AT&T said their companies would not comment on matters of national security.)

After he left the NSA, Binney suggested a system for monitoring people’s communications according to how closely they are connected to an initial target. The further away from the target—say you’re just an acquaintance of a friend of the target—the less the surveillance. But the agency rejected the idea, and, given the massive new storage facility in Utah, Binney suspects that it now simply collects everything. “The whole idea was, how do you manage 20 terabytes of intercept a minute?” he says. “The way we proposed was to distinguish between things you want and things you don’t want.” Instead, he adds, “they’re storing everything they gather.” And the agency is gathering as much as it can.

Once the communications are intercepted and stored, the data-mining begins. “You can watch everybody all the time with data- mining,” Binney says. Everything a person does becomes charted on a graph, “financial transactions or travel or anything,” he says. Thus, as data like bookstore receipts, bank statements, and commuter toll records flow in, the NSA is able to paint a more and more detailed picture of someone’s life.

The NSA also has the ability to eavesdrop on phone calls directly and in real time. According to Adrienne J. Kinne, who worked both before and after 9/11 as a voice interceptor at the NSA facility in Georgia, in the wake of the World Trade Center attacks “basically all rules were thrown out the window, and they would use any excuse to justify a waiver to spy on Americans.” Even journalists calling home from overseas were included. “A lot of time you could tell they were calling their families,” she says, “incredibly intimate, personal conversations.” Kinne found the act of eavesdropping on innocent fellow citizens personally distressing. “It’s almost like going through and finding somebody’s diary,” she says.

But there is, of course, reason for anyone to be distressed about the practice. Once the door is open for the government to spy on US citizens, there are often great temptations to abuse that power for political purposes, as when Richard Nixon eavesdropped on his political enemies during Watergate and ordered the NSA to spy on antiwar protesters. Those and other abuses prompted Congress to enact prohibitions in the mid-1970s against domestic spying.

Before he gave up and left the NSA, Binney tried to persuade officials to create a more targeted system that could be authorized by a court. At the time, the agency had 72 hours to obtain a legal warrant, and Binney devised a method to computerize the system. “I had proposed that we automate the process of requesting a warrant and automate approval so we could manage a couple of million intercepts a day, rather than subvert the whole process.” But such a system would have required close coordination with the courts, and NSA officials weren’t interested in that, Binney says. Instead they continued to haul in data on a grand scale. Asked how many communications—”transactions,” in NSA’s lingo—the agency has intercepted since 9/11, Binney estimates the number at “between 15 and 20 trillion, the aggregate over 11 years.”

When Barack Obama took office, Binney hoped the new administration might be open to reforming the program to address his constitutional concerns. He and another former senior NSA analyst, J. Kirk Wiebe, tried to bring the idea of an automated warrant-approval system to the attention of the Department of Justice’s inspector general. They were given the brush-off. “They said, oh, OK, we can’t comment,” Binney says.

Sitting in a restaurant not far from NSA headquarters, the place where he spent nearly 40 years of his life, Binney held his thumb and forefinger close together. “We are, like, that far from a turnkey totalitarian state,” he says.

Read the rest of this article at Wired.



Leave a Comment

91 Comments on "The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center"


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3 years 3 months ago

This article combined with Snowden's just makes me worry.

Estamos Juntos
4 years 4 months ago

This is what we can see. Imagine what's underground…

4 years 6 months ago

it everyone turned off their computer for a few weeks the government would be in agony

4 years 6 months ago

use as a search machinge instead of google. they don't track and bubble you, ever.

use for a free, privacy conscious email service or host your own.

get the ghostery web browser plugin and block all bugs and trackers. also get AdBlockPlus.

use sandboxie to isolate your web browser from the rest of your computer in a virtual space (dumps all web activity everytime you close your browser, leaving no trace)

use firefox, not chrome.

get peerblock if you use bittorrent. have it running at all times. bans a wide range of anti-p2p groups, adware, and data tracker servers.

ditch your smartphone. they are highly tuned spy devices.

some tips from my side

4 years 6 months ago

This doesn't surprise me anymore…

But anyway, does anyone know a safe email service that can be used?? 🙂

4 years 6 months ago

There is no such thing.

the silent general
4 years 6 months ago

this reminds me of somthing a year ago i was playing world of goo ( if you know what it is ofcours ) there are signs in the font tapes and such in each level when you press them and see whats writen on them………..if i remember corectly there was one sign writen on ''Big brother is watching'' and i didnt pay an attention to that until now

i dont know if its true or not but thats my memory and i start to doubt it but now right now im being creeped out as hell

4 years 6 months ago

Green Day – 21st Century Breakdown – 'Homeland security could kill us all'

They know…

4 years 6 months ago

Big brother operating out in the desert 24-7…

4 years 6 months ago

What a huge insight to the whole scheme. I did learn about Bible prophecy but I couldn't make the link from the Bible to the world in terms of the people or groups of people involved, the different countries or nations that are moving, basically a modernised Bible that doesn't use historical terms. VC has helped me so much with making those links.

4 years 6 months ago
first, I love how you have to put your email in here to respond to an article about personal privacy/security. But my response to this article was that I am so sad and angry that for decades people have been researching the grand conspiracy that has been taking place way before the founding of this country. People have been collecting solid proof from the mouths of the people responsible, and things have only gotten more and more blatant as time goes on, first it was "you're crazy/paranoid", then as the proof becomes too much for their tiny minds to deny, it becomes "oh well, I'm not doing anything wrong" or "what can you do about it?" or the best one…..silence and a blank stare. As the saying goes "you get the government you pay for", we allowed this totalitarian death grip to slowly put the squeeze on us, and not… Read more »
4 years 6 months ago… You have this pretty city, this beautiful Capitol and its nearby surrounding greens. It is centered on this rotunda upon a hill facing a solitary western mall. It has this unique street grid known as the “Enfant Plan”. That features not only North, South and East Capitol Streets, but also diagonals, particularly Maryland and Pennsylvania Avenues extending southwest and northwest respectively from this rotunda, the latter forming the Federal Triangle. The Place has some serious symbolism, yet most people in the U.S. have comparably little grasp of the situation. Sure they see it as a place of corruption, yet as Their Democracy. They acknowledge vaguely a baleful political mass “inside the Beltway”, which they can vaguely attribute to greedy ambition, yet look no further as to its origins, and thus are continually mis-lead, by trusting institutions over truth. They figure that something must be true because it’s repeated so… Read more »
4 years 7 months ago
These huge secret data centers were covered in a Washington Times (or W.Post?) two-years-long investigative series a year or two ago. Search web for "TOP SECRET AMERICA," & the newspaper site has a ton of info about this very thing. They were already building these HUGE "mysterious" data centers in several places around the country at that time. PBS/Frontline then did a few programs about the Washington Times(?) series & showed film footage of these HUGE buildings. Very creepy indeed. Since the Devil has no ultimate control & cannot read people's minds & hearts the way God can, this is the Devil's lame 2nd best attempt via his human puppets who also crave illegitimate power & control. The Devil also cannot inspire or guide people the way the Holy Spirit can, so the Devil's counterfeit to that is drugs. All the Devil's counterfeits are destructive ("the theif comes to rob,… Read more »
Paul Rey Cabahug
4 years 7 months ago

This just makes it more and more interesting why things like these keep coming up. What is this world coming to? If you haven't you could read this article at yahoo

Bigger Brother: Surveillance system compares your face to 36 million others in a second

4 years 7 months ago

I hope those who weren't believers before can finally open their eyes!

4 years 7 months ago

Hi Guys,

This is my first post on VC.

Is America the only country in the world? What about the people in Africa or the 70% of village dwelling folk in India? How are they going to be monitored?

I am from India, where close to 60% don't have access to any media. What about them?

We don't have things like SSN and credit histories?

I am not questioning the views. I am just curious.

4 years 7 months ago

I understand now. Just read the article on the movie "Contagion".

Thank you VC,

God Bless.

4 years 7 months ago

So… I guess NSA "Never Say Anything" will be in full effect for me now, unless you're face to face with me in the middle of no where writing notes on a paper or wispering quietly in my ear, DONT expect me to SAY ANY of importance until this evil bastards are taken down or meet their own demise because the people will ONLY take so much until they take matters into their own hands. Lets hope the people wake up sooner than later.

Oops.. maybe I shouldn't have said that.


4 years 7 months ago

Sigh.. excuse the typos, I clearly don't review before clicking submit, sorry guys, but I'm sure you catch my drift 😉

4 years 7 months ago

@ Heather : The Arrivals are the best series about them ever made..its only that they blocked it the firts time in the original. When the makers of the arrivals had a thing called 'dont see of this as the absolute truth' in their final episode on youtube, is when they did allow the whole series on youtube. Watch the whole series; from part one till the final. I'm a Muslim and I have Christian friends who I consider my family; KNOW YOUR ENEMY.

4 years 7 months ago

No matter what we will do against it (writing letter, securing our searches on the net, etc…), they will always find a way to make us use emails, facebook, etc… The more we evoluate, the more we depend on electrical items : now you can pay with your phone, buy with a phone, etc…so it's easier for them to keep a track of everything.

at a point that it looks like blackmail : if you don't have a facebook account, you can't do this, if you don't have a credit card, you can't do that,etc… cash is less and less accepted and sometimes, not accepted at all in some places. What's the point of all this if it's not the elite who are pushing their plan further? they want to make you feel rejected if you don't comply.

4 years 6 months ago

"cash is less and less accepted and sometimes, not accepted at all in some places."

Cash is legal tender to be accepted in all forms of payment, depending on which country you live under (I say under because in is different).

If a particular store denies your payment in cash, please report them to the BBB, and maybe the FTC. No stores should deny your payment in cash. They can question you, they can suggest or recommend you use credit, but they cannot deny your payment in cash —– until TPTB change the system and move us to a cashless society.

4 years 7 months ago

So appearently, whenever they pass a law to destroy the amendment acts, they distract the public with the some media hits.

its important that you keep focus.

4 years 7 months ago

Well…..if they think people will use products that allow them to spy after they find out that that's what they're up to ….I'm sure we will go back to writing letters…and visiting those we love and things will do opposite of what they think!….no more unwanted bills for things they use against us, to ultimately control us!…God will take what they mean for evil and work it out for our good!…Ha!

this facility is an
4 years 7 months ago

I actually read that whole article in its entirety.

I am dumfounded…………..

It seems the purpose of this facility will be to actually collect information from absolutely everything and everyone worldwide…………. a phone call here, an e-mail there, EVERYTHING……..

This is way too foking much……………………… as if we lived in a world full of criminals everywhere who needed to be spied on in a very hardcore way like this……………………..

What the fock at this mess…………….

"To those on the inside, the old adage that NSA stands for Never Say Anything applies more than ever."

4 years 7 months ago

You think THAT'S scary? Check out what they've had for years…

Pretty sure official death of all those sacri-celebs is some kind of heart failure? Yeah, no wonder.

4 years 7 months ago
"Secrecy is the freedom tyrants dream of." —– Bill Moyers "The very word 'secrecy' is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings." —– John F. Kennedy “It’s only logical to assume that conspiracies are everywhere, because that’s what people do. They conspire. If you can’t get the message, get the man.” —– Mel Gibson (from an interview) “We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false.” —– William Casey, CIA Director "Secrecy, being an instrument of conspiracy, ought never to be the system of a regular government." —– Jeremy Bentham "At that time we were very definitely told that under no circumstances should there be any secret chapters or any other secrecy in the life of the Party, but that everything should be done… Read more »
4 years 7 months ago

Bring back our local postal works and post office write a letter.

oh wait perhaps the mailman works for homeland security or the cia.

4 years 7 months ago

They already know alot.

Our freedoms are being robbed from us.

So lets just give them a earful.

4 years 7 months ago

"the taps in the secret rooms dotting the country are actually powered by highly sophisticated software programs that conduct “deep packet inspection,”

I see your deep packet inspection and raise you:

Switzerland Network Testing Tool

"Switzerland is designed to detect the modification or injection of packets of data traveling over IP networks, including those introduced by anti-P2P tools from Sandvine (widely believed to be used by Comcast to interfere with BitTorrent uploads) and AudibleMagic, advertising injection systems like FairEagle, censorship systems like the Great Firewall of China, and other systems that we don't know about yet."