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How we view Sacred Scriptures


08-14-2015, 10:54 AM #1
khadeejah
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How we view Holy Scriptures
  (sourced from various online Muslim and Christian resources.)

A long post, but I hope worth the read.  There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding between Muslims and Christians in regards to the Holy Scriptures of each faith. In this post I address the following points:
  • How do Muslims view the Quran?
  • How Do Christians view the Quran?
  • How do Christians view the Bible?
  • How do Muslims view the Bible?        
If anyone has anything to add about their understanding of either Scripture in relation to their religious beliefs, please do, but do not say anything derogatory about the Quran or Bible. 

Since I know the Quran better than the Bible I start with it:

How do Muslims view the Quran?  Muslims believe the Quran is the inimitable Word of Almighty God, the Creator of the heavens and earth and all that exists.  It was revealed to Prophet Muhammad (sallAllaahu`alaihi wasallam) through the Angel Gabriel, bit by bit, over the course of 23 years; 13 years while he resided in Makkah and 10 years while he was in Madeenah.
The Quran was revealed in the pure Arabic language (bil-lughah al-`arabiyyah al-fus.hah) and was passed on directly to the companions of Muhammad and his followers.  It is worth noting that at the Farewell Pilgrimage (the Prophet’s only pilgrimage to the Ka`bah before he died), he was accompanied by 100,000 Muslims. The Quran was preserved in the hearts of his followers and has been passed down to this very day by continuous testimony or tawaatur.
Quote:A mutawwatir transmission is one which is passed on by so many narrators directly from the source that it is inconceivable that they could have come to be agreed upon a falsehood with regards the information they collected from the primary source. Therefore, the veracity of what is being narrated by them is unquestionable.  The Quran has reached us both by a rigorous oral transmission and a written form of transmission in tandem. So there was not only a written codex (book) from the time of the Prophet but also a powerful mutawwatir transmission in oral form.  
 It remains unchanged and is recited and memorized by billions of Muslims around the world in the same language that it was originally revealed. 
The Makkan verses generally focus on Tawheed (the Oneness of God) and instructing His servants to know their Creator and act sincerely to Him (al-Ikhlaas), believe in Him (al-Eemaan), love Him (al-Muhabbah), rely on Him (at-Tawakkal), fear (ar-Rahbah) His punishment and hope (ar-Raghbah) for His Mercy.  Other themes are His creation, the Resurrection and Final Judgement, Paradise and Hellfire.  The Madani verses also speak of the Oneness of God and include details regarding the laws and legislations required for the establishment of a community of righteous believers.   
The Quran is the foundation and premier source of guidance for the Islaamic faith.  The second source of revelation is the Sunnah (sayings, actions, and tacit approvals) of Prophet Muhammad (sallAllaahu`alaihi wasallam) but since this post is about the Sacred Scriptures, we will leave off describing the status of the Sunnah in Islaam.

How Do Christians view the Quran?   Most Christians do not believe that the Quran is a revelation from Almighty God, many think it wa scopied from the Bible or from later non Biblical pseudo-gospels and maybe a few think it is a revelation only for the Arabs or Muslims only but it does not apply to people of other faiths.

How do Christians view the Bible?   Christians believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God.  It is a compilation of books and letters (66 in Protestant canon, 73 in Catholic canon and 81 in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church canon), written by more than 40 authors during a period of approximately 1,500 years. Its original text was communicated in three languages. The Old Testament was written for the most part in Hebrew, with a small percentage in Aramaic and the New Testament was written in Koine (common dialect) Greek. The Old Testament contained in the Christian Bible is based upon the Septuagint which is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures. Going beyond its two main sections--the Old and New Testament--the Bible contains several more divisions: in the OT there are the Pentateuch, the Historical Books, the Poetry and Wisdom Books, and the books of Prophecy.  In the NT there are the Gospels (which relate the life, works and teachings of Jesus), and the Epistles (letters from the disciples of the apostles to different nations preaching salvation in Christ). The epistles of Paul were the first  books of the New Testament to be written.
The Bible describes God's interaction with mankind, His purposes and plans, from the beginning of time and throughout history.  The books and letters it contains were inspired to their writers by the Holy Ghost, the third person of the Trinity (Father, Son and Holy Ghost).   The Son, the second person of the Trinity, spoke through the Old Testament scriptures before becoming incarnate. When Jesus in the New Testament quotes the verses of the Old Testament, he is quoting himself.  The central theme of the Bible is God's plan of salvation -  his way of providing deliverance from sin and spiritual death through repentance and faith. In the Old Testament, the concept of salvation is rooted in Israel's deliverance from Egypt in the book of Exodus.  The New Testament reveals the source of salvation: Jesus Christ. By faith in Jesus, believers are saved from God's judgment of sin and its consequence, which is eternal death.  Through typology and allegory, the theme of Atonement through the blood of Christ is inferred throughout the Old and New Testaments.
The Christian faith is founded on the church doctrines which were passed down from the apostles and their disciples.  While there existed hundreds of early Christian writings, Marcion of Sinope was the first Christian leader in recorded history (though later, considered heretical) to propose and delineate a uniquely Christian canon (ca. 140), and in 367, the church father Athanasius first provided the complete listing of the books belonging to the canon while the final version used today by Protestants was canonized after the year 400 and the 73 books of the Catholic Bible were canonized in the 16th century.  Regardless the canon they adhere to, Christians of all sects hold that the books of the Bible were included on account of God inspiring their writing and superintending each book’s preservation.  

How do Muslims view the Bible?    It is an article of Islamic faith to believe in all of God’s Books that He revealed to His Chosen Prophets as guidance for their nations. Muslims believe that the Bible contains remnants of the original Revelations given to the Israelite prophets from the Almighty God.  These include the Taurat (Torah) which was revealed to Moses by which he organized and ruled the Children of Israel as a community of believers, the Zabur (Psalms) given to David, and the Injeel (Gospel/Evangil) that was revealed to Jesus as guidance for the Children of Israel.  Muslims believe that all of the prophets followed the same religion which was to worship God Alone and turn away from all false deities and that this is at the core of their teachings which they received from God.  All of God’s prophets were also instructed to tell their people about the coming of the Final prophet to all of mankind, Muhammad, and for these reasons,  Muslims accept as true,  those verses in the Bible which are in agreement with the tenets of Islam.

and Peace be upon those who follow true guidance.
This post was last modified: 10-30-2016, 05:43 PM by khadeejah. Edit Reason: Axiom


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08-14-2015, 11:46 AM #2
Todd
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Khadeejah,

Although many Christians may agree with your section "How Christian's view the Bible" and "How Christian's view the Quran" I have an objection with the Trinity statements.  

I have never been one to argue strongly for the doctrine of the Trinity.  I have spent much of my Christian life involved with Churches that believe the Doctrine of the Trinity, but I have never been quite comfortable with it myself.   Discussions on this forum in the last couple of months have caused me to study and seek God about it.  I believe as seekers of truth we should strive to gain understanding in all things. (Proverbs 4:7, 18:2, 1 Cor 2:12, 2 Tim 2:7)

I realized through sharing in one thread, my thoughts about God the Father, Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit, that I did not understand what the Bible truly teaches (or doesn't teach) about the "Trinity".  Like many doctrines I have been taught in the past, I have been forced to re-evaluate my beliefs and search what the Bible actually says about it and I can say that I have come full circle to reject the Doctrine of the Trinity as un-Biblical.

I don't go as far as saying Jesus is only a prophet, according to Muslim beliefs.  According to John chapter 1, The Word was with God, the Word is God, all things were created by the Word, and that Word was made flesh in Jesus Christ.  Jesus made many statements affirming that He is God. 

Through research and prayer, I believe I have a better Biblical based understanding of the Father and the Son.  I also believe I have a scriptural argument that shows that the Father and the Son can both be God as separate "persons" but still be "ONE".   Yet I have found ZERO biblical basis that the Holy Spirit is a separate entity form God the Father or Jesus Christ our Lord.   It's not a quick explanation so maybe I'll save that for another thread.   I'm still studying it out completely so it may be awhile before I choose to post fully on the subject.

I have read through the Quran recently, and I have to say my initial impression was that I could not reconcile it with the Bible.  However I may have to reconsider.  Though my conclusions won't likely be accepted by many Muslims, I'm open to the possibility that the Quran may not contradict the Bible as much as both Muslim's and Christians think.  

No I am not contemplating renouncing Christianity to become a Muslim.  I am still 100% convinced that Jesus is more than Prophet and that He is my Lord and Savior, so I believe that still qualifies me as a Christian, whether mainstream Christianity accepts me or not!   All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

As far as the Bible goes, I view it as the revealing of Jesus Christ.  Jesus himself said the OT is about him in John 5:37-39.  Every other subject or theme of the Bible is secondary to the revelation of Jesus Christ.

Then shall the king say to those on his right hand, Come ye, the blessed of my Father, inherit the reign that hath been prepared for you from the foundation of the world;

And the king answering, shall say to them, Verily I say to you, Inasmuch as ye did to one of these my brethren -- the least -- to me ye did

08-14-2015, 12:36 PM #3
instinct
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(08-14-2015, 11:46 AM)Todd Wrote:  All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

You don't need to think too hard about it; it's a load of hogwash, just like the bible.

08-14-2015, 12:42 PM #4
anne
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(08-14-2015, 12:36 PM)instinct Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 11:46 AM)Todd Wrote:  All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

You don't need to think too hard about it; it's a load of hogwash, just like the bible.

Seriously dude, if you hate religion so much,why don't you keep out of the threads intended for religious purposes?
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08-14-2015, 12:43 PM #5
Kung Fu
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(08-14-2015, 12:36 PM)instinct Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 11:46 AM)Todd Wrote:  All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

You don't need to think too hard about it; it's a load of hogwash, just like the bible.

Your one line responses don't mean anything. Instead of showing us how very little you know why not participate properly in a discussion and show us how religion is hogwash?

Prophet Muhammad (SallAllahu alaihi wasalam) said:

"My similitude and that of the life of this world is that of a traveler who took a rest at mid-day under a shade of a tree and then left it."       (Ahmad, at-Tirmidhi, Ibn Majah and al-Hakim)

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08-14-2015, 12:47 PM #6
instinct
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(08-14-2015, 12:42 PM)anne Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 12:36 PM)instinct Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 11:46 AM)Todd Wrote:  All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

You don't need to think too hard about it; it's a load of hogwash, just like the bible.

Seriously dude, if you hate religion so much,why don't you keep out of the threads intended for religious purposes?

Oh, I'm sorry, I didn't realize participation in religion threads was only open to religious people here.

08-14-2015, 12:48 PM #7
instinct
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(08-14-2015, 12:43 PM)Kung Fu Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 12:36 PM)instinct Wrote:  
(08-14-2015, 11:46 AM)Todd Wrote:  All that to say as a Christian, I have yet to fully conclude what my view of the Quran is.

You don't need to think too hard about it; it's a load of hogwash, just like the bible.

Your one line responses don't mean anything. Instead of showing us how very little you know why not participate properly in a discussion and show us how religion is hogwash?

I simply shared my opinion; it means something to me. I didn't realize every post required an essay. What would you like to know exactly, because that's a broad question that could fill up a book.
This post was last modified: 08-14-2015, 12:49 PM by instinct.

08-14-2015, 12:51 PM #8
Scimitar
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well, I'm not interested in what you have to say here.... you're just the entertainment.

the meat is with the real contributors here.

Scimi

Out beyond ideas
of wrong-doing,


and right-doing,

there is a field...

...I'll meet you there.
€



Jalaluddin Rumi
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08-14-2015, 01:13 PM #9
Kung Fu
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(08-14-2015, 12:48 PM)instinct Wrote:  I simply shared my opinion; it means something to me. I didn't realize every post required an essay. What would you like to know exactly, because that's a broad question that could fill up a book.

Your opinion is worth less than horse shit when you have nothing logical to back it up with. Why even bother posting if no one is going to take you seriously because you contribute nothing to the discussion?

I don't want to know anything, I just find it funny that posters like you don't contribute to anything on these forums. Instead of typing and saying nothing of importance why not actually try to engage and answer the OP's questions and or refute them using proper sources and logical reasoning? Here's a hint, it's going to need to be longer than a sentence based on your opinion alone.

Prophet Muhammad (SallAllahu alaihi wasalam) said:

"My similitude and that of the life of this world is that of a traveler who took a rest at mid-day under a shade of a tree and then left it."       (Ahmad, at-Tirmidhi, Ibn Majah and al-Hakim)

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08-14-2015, 01:16 PM #10
Tarikko
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This ignorant believes the official version of 9/11 events... Nuff said

I wonder what he is doing on a conspiracy website
This post was last modified: 08-14-2015, 01:18 PM by Tarikko.


“The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammad) are disgraceful to ourselves only.”


― Thomas Carlyle, On Heroes, Hero Worship and the Heroic in History