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Merkel the neocon Hitler?


07-14-2015, 11:02 AM #1
justjess
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Quote: The rise and fall of the German Empire: What Greece’s crippling bailout deal reveals about the future of Europe
Germany has dominated the Eurozone and forced it to run according to its parochial interests. What happens now?

David Dayen Follow


The flag of Europe still has twelve stars on it, and organizations with names like Eurogroup and European Commission and European Council still persist. But despite the unfortunate historical overtones, in order to be accurate we need to call the governing body in Europe the German Empire, after the events of this weekend. And the thing about empires is that they end sooner or later, because human beings don’t much like to be controlled by an overlord they never elected or endorsed.

The end of the German Empire will not take place today. Greece folded, giving up their sovereignty and agreeing to all the creditors’ demands, even to sell off national assets, without achieving anything more than a vague promise of debt relief in return. They decided to accept the devil they knew – crushing austerity, a worse package than what was on the table just weeks ago – rather than the devil they didn’t – the Grexit.

But that’s only the end of the story if you think Greece will meet the punitive objectives laid out in the surrender document, which look like the terms you impose on a country that lost a war. And even if they did manage to meet those terms, you would have to believe that austerity would generate economic growth to enable Greece to pay its debts back at some future stage. In this sense, it was a delay of the final outcome.

Far more important than the details of the Greek occupation – you can read the gory details here – is the manner in which it was employed. The German consuls were as vindictive as possible, slowly and deliberately grinding down the Greek economy, carpet-bombing the political opposition, and openly threatening expulsion from the European monetary union as punishment. The European Central Bank, Germany’s weapon of choice, supported the most crass form of economic bullying to stifle dissent that I’ve ever seen. The primary responsibility of a central bank is to manage the money supply in the countries it is associated with. The ECB did that by cutting off the money supply to Greece, no different than denying food to refugees. In fact, it’s very precisely the same, given the shortages of basic needs resulting from Greek importers having no way to ensure payment for goods.

(As a side note, some in the Greek government did in fact see this coming, if you believe former Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis. But to prepare for such sadistic behavior on the part of the central bank is akin to preparing for an ambush by a psychopath. There’s not much for one to do.)

None of the satellite countries in the German empire missed the message. Step out of line, try to reverse an austerity agenda that has brought recession, if not outright depression, to the countries forced into its maw, and you will be pulverized, humiliated, forced to grovel and beg forgiveness.

The precious Greek debt that Germany, and to a lesser extent northern European partners like Finland, Austria and the Netherlands, refuses to cancel can be seen as excess funds the Germans acquired by dominating the Eurozone and forcing it to run according to its parochial interests. Germany doesn’t maintain a solid manufacturing base simply because of its industriousness and pluck. It operates with the benefit of an undervalued currency, blended to incorporate poorer countries like Greece.

This makes German goods artificially cheaper on the world market, boosting its economy at the expense of its Eurozone partners. Italy has had virtually no growth since the euro’s initiation in 1999. Spain and Portugal have not prospered. France is moving toward stall speed. So it’s not unreasonable to see the substantial debt Greece owes directly to Germany as recompense for all the money the German economy has been making off of Greece’s inclusion in the euro.

Of course, Germany doesn’t see it that way. They see it as a struggle of will, where they were the sober, cost-conscious paragons of virtue, no longer accepting of the lazy profligacy of their southern neighbors. This topples everything the European Union project was supposed to be about, with all the ugly nationalism that helped light the fire for two world wars rising to the surface.

In reality, the dream of a United States of Europe was never realistic, given these primal forces. If it was, the parties involved would have set up a legitimate fiscal union and real power to the elected European parliament. Instead, they built a way for Germany to lord over a series of client states. And this became very clear amid economic crisis.

As Wolfgang Munchau writes, expulsion from the German empire, with the explicit promise of economic immiseration down that road, is now squarely on the table in any future talks with Greece, or any other country that manages to get itself into trouble. And other countries will; at least, they will occasionally seek fiscal or monetary policy interventions at odds with the emperor’s wishes. There is no democratic political union anymore, it’s just a shotgun marriage run on threats.
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Once you eliminate that democratic possibility of a Europe based on shared interests, once you affirm that only the interests of one ruling nation matters, there’s no real advantage to everyone sticking together other than fear. And fear doesn’t last forever, particularly when those supposed to be afraid of the unknown are stripped of everything they’ve got in the process. Does this mean that Britain will now leave the European Union, the subject of a coming vote? Does it mean that the next left-wing anti-austerity or right-wing Euroskeptic party that comes into power will not suffer the same fate as Syriza? It’s hard to predict when the German Empire will fall, just that it will.

Why should this matter to a farmer in Indiana or an office worker in New Jersey? It certainly mattered to America the last two times European great powers sniped at one another; these things tend to escalate. In addition, there’s nothing approaching economic logic in what the satellite states of the German Empire have been forced to endure, and at some point that can bleed over. Most important, the inevitable breakup will breed a global instability layered atop an already shaky world.

The #ThisIsACoup hashtag that pinged around the world over the weekend shows a loss of popular support for a project whose supporters can be confined to small rooms of elites in Brussels and Berlin. Even empires need someone to believe in them. Otherwise, the coup plotters become vulnerable

http://www.salon.com/2015/07/14/the_rise...socialflow
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07-14-2015, 12:42 PM #2
justjess
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Quote:In an article due to be published in popular German newspaper Die Zeit this coming Thursday, Greek ex-Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis will accuse Germany of hiding the truth about its real aims for Europe, and say his country’s exit from the single currency is all part of a plan hatched a long time ago to ‘discipline’ countries who do not do as they are told. Varoufakis has written an op-ed in order to address Germany’s citizens directly. He will name German Finance Minister Dr. Wolfgang Schäuble as the man behind a conspiracy to re-structure the Eurozone in a way which favors banks over citizens and plutocracy over democracy.

First, a short summary of recent events (you can read the full back story here): Yanis Varoufakis was forced out of office earlier this month after his party Syriza called a referendum, asking the people of Greece whether they wanted to stay in the Eurozone (meaning more debt and more austerity) or say no to more bailout funds and face the consequences. The Greek people, tired of economic suffering at the hands of European bankers, voted against austerity and further cash injections from the Troika (the EC, ECB and IMF). This result was something which Varoufakis and Prime Minister Alexis Tspiras considered a victory- and yet hours later, Varoufakis had resigned, claiming that powerful figures within the Eurozone had refused to negotiate with Greece further while he was in office.

As an economist and a socialist who spoke passionately and intelligently on behalf of Greece’s weary citzens, Varoufakis was feared and loathed by bankers (but defiantly, he said he would wear their contempt “with pride”.) Now, just days before the German article goes to press, Varoufakis explains on his blog:

‘Five months of intense negotiations between Greece and the Eurogroup never had a chance of success. Condemned to lead to impasse, their purpose was to pave the ground for what Dr Schäuble had decided was ‘optimal’ well before our government was even elected: That Greece should be eased out of the Eurozone in order to discipline member-states resisting his very specific plan for re-structuring the Eurozone.’

More importantly, Varoufakis claims that Dr Schäuble told him directly that Greece’s exit (commonly known as ‘Grexit’) was part of this long term vision for Europe, and ‘this was the plan well before people’s party Syriza came to power in Greece‘.

Varoufakis wants to make it clear that people understand his position: ‘I wrote this article not as a Greek politician critical of the German press’ denigration of our sensible proposals, of Berlin’s refusal seriously to consider our moderate debt re-profiling plan, of the European Central Bank’s highly political decision to asphyxiate our government, of the Eurogroup’s decision to give the ECB the green light to shut down our banks’, he says, thinly masking his feelings on these critical issues. ‘I wrote this article as a European observing the unfolding of a particular Plan for Europe – Dr Schäuble’s Plan.’

An update with key points from the translated Die Zeit article will be added on Thursday as Varoufakis’s op-ed breaks.

The above Financial Times video from February this year documents a meeting between Schäuble and Varoufakis. The reporter notes how Schäuble has been “from the outset very hostile to attempts by Athens to re-write and scrap the existing agreement and to look for something new.” The two men were never going to agree: but now Varoufakis is out of the picture and Greece’s PM Tspiras has suddenly made a shocking U-turn on the referendum result (making huge concessions to Schäuble in what the Greek people have called “treason”), does this spell the end for people-powered politics in Greece?


this is something you guys really should be paying more attention to then the letter M..
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 12:42 PM by justjess.

07-14-2015, 12:44 PM #3
monkey
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Germany wasn't the only country there. And Germany isn't the country that'd be worse hit

They made this deal to make Greece pay. But.... Greece has borrowed and borrowed and borrowed, that was never going to be sustainable. They took no steps to reduce spending, but kept borrowing.

If their debt was forgiven, it'd have hurt all the other countries in the EU. True, Germany's been far more brutal than needed, but that's more to dissuade anyone else from trying the sort of stunt Greece did

07-14-2015, 12:48 PM #4
justjess
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germany's debt was forgiven by the rest of europe at one point.. the rest of europe did not crumble.

if you are a union, like the united states is a union, then you help out your other members and support them you do not try to take over their government and leave them in abject poverty by any means necessary. the greeks should have borrowed less money, the banks shouldnt have lent it to them knowing their situation if they were so concerned.

but have u seen germanys list of demands? they basically want full control of greece. that is not acceptable.
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07-14-2015, 12:55 PM #5
Briandao
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(07-14-2015, 12:48 PM)justjess Wrote:  germany's debt was forgiven by the rest of europe at one point.. the rest of europe did not crumble.

if you are a union, like the united states is a union, then you help out your other members and support them you do not try to take over their government and leave them in abject poverty by any means necessary. the greeks should have borrowed less money, the banks shouldnt have lent it to them knowing their situation if they were so concerned.

but have u seen germanys list of demands? they basically want full control of greece. that is not acceptable.

The worst part of all this is that the current generation and generations to come will have to be the one's suffering for mistakes they didn't make.

Yes, I know that is "how it works", but that doesn't make it acceptable.

Oh, and they are not meant to help other members.

The European "Union" is nothing more than a way to trick people into feeling a false sense of security.

It's no union at all.
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 01:29 PM by Briandao.

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07-14-2015, 12:58 PM #6
justjess
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i feel like the current german government has finally succeeded where previous german governments have failed.. they have near complete control of all of europe and they achieved it through finances and manipulation rather than violence.

it is a damn shame. the greeks are a proud people and this whole situation is devastating. i personally would like to see tsipras head. he totally sold out his own country at the last minute rather then follow their wishes. what the heck was the point of a referendum? if i was a greek id be rioting


for chrissakes the german finance minister has a book called: "Is the West failing? Germany and the new world order"
i can not find anything about its contents because apparantly it was never printed in english and is not available here for sale
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 01:09 PM by justjess.

07-14-2015, 01:13 PM #7
SheWatches
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(07-14-2015, 12:58 PM)justjess Wrote:  it is a damn shame. the greeks are a proud people and this whole situation is devastating. i personally would like to see tsipras head. he totally sold out his own country at the last minute rather then follow their wishes. what the heck was the point of a referendum? if i was a greek id be rioting
   Don't worry, they will.  I thought they were near-rioting already the way Spain & France has had unrest due to lack of employment.

How do they get the "m" on the M&M?

07-14-2015, 02:08 PM #8
Briandao
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(07-14-2015, 12:58 PM)justjess Wrote:  i feel like the current german government has finally succeeded where previous german governments have failed.. they have near complete control of all of europe and they achieved it through finances and manipulation rather than violence.

it is a damn shame. the greeks are a proud people and this whole situation is devastating. i personally would like to see tsipras head. he totally sold out his own country at the last minute rather then follow their wishes. what the heck was the point of a referendum? if i was a greek id be rioting


for chrissakes the german finance minister has a book called: "Is the West failing? Germany and the new world order"
i can not find anything about its contents because apparantly it was never printed in english and is not available here for sale

The fact that the outcome of the referendum was totally ignored in the decision making should be the ultimate proof that the European "Union" is not built on democratic principles at all.

But to get EU-lovers to understand that and to make them realize what the actual purpose of the creation of EU was is harder than to stop the conflict between Israel and Palestine.

(07-14-2015, 12:42 PM)justjess Wrote:  
Quote:In an article due to be published in popular German newspaper Die Zeit this coming Thursday, Greek ex-Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis will accuse Germany of hiding the truth about its real aims for Europe, and say his country’s exit from the single currency is all part of a plan hatched a long time ago to ‘discipline’ countries who do not do as they are told. Varoufakis has written an op-ed in order to address Germany’s citizens directly. He will name German Finance Minister Dr. Wolfgang Schäuble as the man behind a conspiracy to re-structure the Eurozone in a way which favors banks over citizens and plutocracy over democracy.

First, a short summary of recent events (you can read the full back story here): Yanis Varoufakis was forced out of office earlier this month after his party Syriza called a referendum, asking the people of Greece whether they wanted to stay in the Eurozone (meaning more debt and more austerity) or say no to more bailout funds and face the consequences. The Greek people, tired of economic suffering at the hands of European bankers, voted against austerity and further cash injections from the Troika (the EC, ECB and IMF). This result was something which Varoufakis and Prime Minister Alexis Tspiras considered a victory-  and yet hours later, Varoufakis had resigned, claiming that powerful figures within the Eurozone had refused to negotiate with Greece further while he was in office.

As an economist and a socialist who spoke passionately and intelligently on behalf of Greece’s weary citzens, Varoufakis was feared and loathed by bankers (but defiantly, he said he would wear their contempt “with pride”.) Now, just days before the German article goes to press, Varoufakis explains on his blog:

‘Five months of intense negotiations between Greece and the Eurogroup never had a chance of success. Condemned to lead to impasse, their purpose was to pave the ground for what Dr Schäuble had decided was ‘optimal’ well before our government was even elected: That Greece should be eased out of the Eurozone in order to discipline member-states resisting his very specific plan for re-structuring the Eurozone.’

More importantly, Varoufakis claims that Dr Schäuble told him directly that Greece’s exit (commonly known as ‘Grexit’) was part of this long term vision for Europe, and ‘this was the plan well before people’s party Syriza came to power in Greece‘.

Varoufakis wants to make it clear that people understand his position: ‘I wrote this article not as a Greek politician critical of the German press’ denigration of our sensible proposals, of Berlin’s refusal seriously to consider our moderate debt re-profiling plan, of the European Central Bank’s highly political decision to asphyxiate our government, of the Eurogroup’s decision to give the ECB the green light to shut down our banks’, he says, thinly masking his feelings on these critical issues. ‘I wrote this article as a European observing the unfolding of a particular Plan for Europe – Dr Schäuble’s Plan.’

An update with key points from the translated Die Zeit article will be added on Thursday as Varoufakis’s op-ed breaks.

The above Financial Times video from February this year documents a meeting between Schäuble and Varoufakis. The reporter notes how Schäuble has been “from the outset very hostile to attempts by Athens to re-write and scrap the existing agreement and to look for something new.” The two men were never going to agree: but now Varoufakis is out of the picture and Greece’s PM Tspiras has suddenly made a shocking U-turn on the referendum result (making huge concessions to Schäuble in what the Greek people have called “treason”), does this spell the end for people-powered politics in Greece?


this is something you guys really should be paying more attention to then the letter M..

The letter M?
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 02:18 PM by Briandao.

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  • SheWatches

07-14-2015, 02:23 PM #9
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It's not really Germany who's in control. There's no tangible German "empire" that we can all see and feel. The empire that currently oppresses people internationally is the monetary system with usury at its core, and Germany has the beating heart of it, Frankfurt-am-Main (Rothschild bastion), which is to the European continent what the City of London is to the UK, or Wall Street to the US. It's also home to the ECB, proxy of the Federal Reserve.

The European Union is not a German creation meant to expand and sustain German hegemony over Europe. It's a declassified CIA op with the purpose of subjecting the European economy to Wall Street. If Germany was really all that powerful and solely after its own interest, it would've kicked Greece out of the union and eurozone a long time ago because Greece is costing them money, alot of money. Given the fact that approximately 97% of the loans to supposedly "aid" Greece merely serves to settle interests of previous debts, the only ones who truly benefit are private banks. It's a vicious circle of debt creation where the loaned money in Greece has a lifespan of two digital transactions before it returns whence it came.

This latest settlement that wuss Alexander Tsipras agreed to with the Eurogroup (against the result of his own referendum ???) gives Greece 85 billion euros of which 50 billion euros is reserved to recapitalize Greek banks, while the Greek tax payer will be charged to pay off that debt.

This isn't about a German empire. There's no German vs Greece no more than there's a Washington vs Michigan. This is about private banks vs people.

And Merkel licks Uncle Sam's balls.

İmage
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 03:15 PM by Gorilla.

It's a little like wrestling a gorilla. You don't quit when you're tired - you quit when the gorilla is tired.
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07-14-2015, 02:27 PM #10
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(07-14-2015, 12:48 PM)justjess Wrote:  germany's debt was forgiven by the rest of europe at one point.. the rest of europe did not crumble.

if you are a union, like the united states is a union, then you help out your other members and support them you do not try to take over their government and leave them in abject poverty by any means necessary. the greeks should have borrowed less money, the banks shouldnt have lent it to them knowing their situation if they were so concerned.

but have u seen germanys list of demands? they basically want full control of greece. that is not acceptable.

They have not only taken over their government but they have basically in a nut shell bought all of Greece and their assets for pennies when in reality they're worth billions.

This is how these Zionist Jewish banks get you. They lend you out money that they know you will never be able to pay back and then through the guise of collection they take 10x more then they lent you. Talk about getting a lot for nothing.

Greece could easily default but because their government is bought and owned by European elites they won't.
This post was last modified: 07-14-2015, 02:27 PM by Kung Fu.

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