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08-22-2016, 03:57 AM #1
Karlysymon
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Marshall
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There are stories that one reads that make one reflect on our culture/society or life in general. So if you have come across one lately, preferably non-fiction, in a newspaper or magazine or elsewhere, please post it. They shouldn't be long. Paragragh or two. You can post your moral of the story and others can post theirs too. With added commentary if you like! So i will start with mine.
" While eating breakfast, a man
was listening to his wife read
from the news about a
tragedy in another country
that had left thousands dead.
After talking for a few moments about how terrible
it was, he then changed the
subject and asked if the local
soccer team had won the
match the night before"
Much has been written about how the ever increasing number of terrorist acts has created apathy among the masses, exhausting them emotionally and having an attitude of 'am done hearing these stories, i dont want to know'.
*Psychologists Explain Why
People Refuse to Question the
Official Version of 9/11*
"Firstly, it is critical to bring
attention to the severity of
trauma incurred when
witnessing and processing an
event of this magnitude. The
nation, and much of the world, is still suffering from mass,
collective PTSD, and as time
goes by, our exposure to more
acts of terror only amplify our
attempts to bury this trauma
within the psyche".


http://wakingtimes.com/2016/06/30/psycho...rsion-911/
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08-23-2016, 06:13 AM #2
Karlysymon
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Marshall
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A 17-year-old girl,
struggling with what most 17-
year-old girls struggle with,
except with so much more, took
her own life. Who could imagine
the parents’ devastation? Their pastor came over to the
house. He sat down in the living
room next to them and for a
long time said nothing. He just
immersed himself in their grief.
Then he, the pastor, started sobbing. He sobbed until his
tears ran dry. Then, without
saying a word, he got up and
left. Sometime later, the father told
him how much he appreciated
what the pastor had done. He
and his wife, at that time, didn’t
need words, didn’t need
promises, didn’t need counseling. All they needed,
right then and there, was raw
sympathy. “I can’t tell you,” he said to the
minister, “how much your
sympathy meant to us.”
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08-23-2016, 08:06 AM #3
Karlysymon
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Marshall
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Sometimes life is a tragic romance.
Elmi Bodheri, one of Somalia’s
most celebrated modern poets
died of a broken heart. Bodheri was a poor baker;
whose poems written in the
1930-1940s made him a
literary legend, household name
and lovers’ hero. It all began
when he worked for his uncle in Berbera, making bread and
selling it in what was then
British Somaliland. One fine day
he saw and was instantly
smitten with a girl named
Hodhan who came in for bread rolls or something like that. So
he began reciting impromptu
poetry to her over the counter-
suddenly, and with neither
inkling nor warning. That brief
but oh-so-meaningful encounter caused Bodheri to venture forth
in verse from then onwards
although the pair’s eyes never
again met, let alone their hearts. “I
have been compelled to weep
for love’s sake,” he declared. “Oh
God! How much has my mouth
betrayed me? And how people
have been so cruel to me!” Bodheri and
Hodhan weren’t meant to be. So was it a mutual attraction?
Only Hodhan knew for sure,
given as the culture of the time
prohibited girls from speaking
of such matters At 15, she
married a clerk, became a seamstress and raised nine
children. She never spoke of
Bodheri, but poetry did: this oral
tradition travels fast among
Somalis, and everyone knew she
was the Hodhan. Bodheri’s own wife got fed up
of him calling her “Hodhan” and
left him. The love-lorn baker
withered and wasted away
until his death in the 40s. Today, many Somali girls grow up hoping for an attraction as
strong as Bodheri’s was for
Hodhan and to be loved as
wildly and deeply. The immortal
tragic couple that never was
often show up in modern Somali love songs and poems.
Many Somali men say living up to
Bodheri’s romantic reputation is
a tough call. One Somali
politician even proposed to his
wife by saying: “OK, I can’t love you like Bodheri loved Hodhan.
But I can love you.”
“If eyes could capture the
splendour that could soothe the
heart
Or human beings could be
satisfied by beauty alone
I have seen already that of Hodhan.” – Elmi Bodheri
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08-24-2016, 02:35 AM #4
DesertRose1
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Karlysmon Greetings!
I wanted to contribute to your thread, peace.Smile
Apologies for the many paragraphs.

My thoughts on article (skip till ya read the article):
It is all a matter of economics the more people you are exposed to the better "chance" of meeting someone.
location, location, location........... Big Grin

Advice to young women in Princeton.
Forget about having it all, or not having it all, leaning in or leaning out — here’s what you really need to know that nobody is telling you.
For years (decades, really) we have been bombarded with advice on professional advancement, breaking through that glass ceiling and achieving work-life balance. We can figure that out — we are Princeton women. If anyone can overcome professional obstacles, it will be our brilliant, resourceful, very well-educated selves.
A few weeks ago, I attended the Women and Leadership conference on campus that featured a conversation between President Shirley Tilghman and Wilson School professor Anne-Marie Slaughter, and I participated in the breakout session afterward that allowed current undergraduate women to speak informally with older and presumably wiser alumnae.
I attended the event with my best friend since our freshman year in 1973. You girls glazed over at preliminary comments about our professional accomplishments and the importance of networking. Then the conversation shifted in tone and interest level when one of you asked how have Kendall and I sustained a friendship for 40 years. You asked if we were ever jealous of each other. You asked about the value of our friendship, about our husbands and children. Clearly, you don’t want any more career advice. At your core, you know that there are other things that you need that nobody is addressing. A lifelong friend is one of them. Finding the right man to marry is another.

When I was an undergraduate in the mid-seventies, the 200 pioneer women in my class would talk about navigating the virile plains of Princeton as a precursor to professional success. Never being one to shy away from expressing an unpopular opinion, I said that I wanted to get married and have children. It was seen as heresy.
For most of you, the cornerstone of your future and happiness will be inextricably linked to the man you marry, and you will never again have this concentration of men who are worthy of you.
Here’s what nobody is telling you: Find a husband on campus before you graduate. Yes, I went there.
I am the mother of two sons who are both Princetonians. My older son had the good judgment and great fortune to marry a classmate of his, but he could have married anyone. My younger son is a junior and the universe of women he can marry is limitless. Men regularly marry women who are younger, less intelligent, less educated. It’s amazing how forgiving men can be about a woman’s lack of erudition, if she is exceptionally pretty. Smart women can’t (shouldn’t) marry men who aren’t at least their intellectual equal.

As Princeton women, we have almost priced ourselves out of the market. Simply put, there is a very limited population of men who are as smart or smarter than we are. And I say again — you will never again be surrounded by this concentration of men who are worthy of you.
Of course, once you graduate, you will meet men who are your intellectual equal — just not that many of them. And, you could choose to marry a man who has other things to recommend him besides a soaring intellect. But ultimately, it will frustrate you to be with a man who just isn’t as smart as you.
Here is another truth that you know, but nobody is talking about. As freshman women, you have four classes of men to choose from. Every year, you lose the men in the senior class, and you become older than the class of incoming freshman men. So, by the time you are a senior, you basically have only the men in your own class to choose from, and frankly, they now have four classes of women to choose from. Maybe you should have been a little nicer to these guys when you were freshmen?
If I had daughters, this is what I would be telling them.
Susan A. Patton ’77
This post was last modified: 08-24-2016, 03:18 AM by DesertRose1.

"Its better to walk alone, than with a crowd going in the wrong direction."
“O people, spread peace (extend greetings), feed the hungry, and pray at night when people are sleeping and you will enter Paradise in peace.”
[Sunan Ibn Majah 1334 (Sahih)]
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08-25-2016, 11:30 AM #5
Karlysymon
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Marshall
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@DesertRose
Thanx alot. I actually read this Anne-Marie Slaughter piece in The Atlantic a long time ago. Having this same conversation with a male very recently, men have caught on that women can have it all and should have it all and yet its just not possible. Maybe you should start a thread on this or is this all discussed under the feminism thread???? Feminism, sexual revolution and the subsequent divorce boom of the 70s, women joining the workforce and overtaking men have bequeathed alot to the current generation and cultural landscape. Its a huge topic that interests me.
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08-25-2016, 11:47 AM #6
Karlysymon
***
Marshall
Status: Offline Posts:284 Likes Received:681
A story about a man in a
boat who began to drill a hole
under his feet where he sat.
When people in the boat
demanded that he stop, he
responded: "This is none of your business. This is my place!"
Anything we do or don’t do has an impact
on others, especially on those
nearest to us. Who hasn’t felt, in
a big way, the results of other
people’s actions, either good or
bad?
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08-25-2016, 01:31 PM #7
DesertRose1
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Karlysymon you are welcome.....
I also have an article regarding my thoughts on tragic love.......I will hunt for it somewhere I cannot believe that people will die or kill themselves for it Dodgy Sheesh.!
Our purpose is not about that according to Islam..........
Tbh I have issues with third wave feminism however the earlier versions were about justice and fairness so I have mixed reviews. Big Grin
This post was last modified: 08-25-2016, 01:38 PM by DesertRose1.

"Its better to walk alone, than with a crowd going in the wrong direction."
“O people, spread peace (extend greetings), feed the hungry, and pray at night when people are sleeping and you will enter Paradise in peace.”
[Sunan Ibn Majah 1334 (Sahih)]

08-26-2016, 03:25 PM #8
khadeejah
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Chaplain
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Political Acumen

It was said to a ruler: What has made you reach this level? 
He said,  I forgave when I was able to exact revenge, I was soft even when i was severe, I was just even regarding my ownself, and I left enough place in my love and hate so that I could still easily change from one to the other."


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08-27-2016, 02:12 PM #9
Karlysymon
***
Marshall
Status: Offline Posts:284 Likes Received:681
Years ago, in a big Western city, a woman was being attacked at night on a street. She cried out for help; dozens heard her, yet not one person even bothered
to call the police. Most people looked out the window and then went back to whatever they were doing. Soon the woman’s cries stopped. Later, she was found dead, stabbed numerous times. Were the people who heard her
cries but did nothing
responsible for her death?
Though they hadn’t attacked
her themselves, did their inaction kill her?
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08-28-2016, 02:06 AM #10
DesertRose1
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I definitely think they were responsible for not stopping an injustice.
Our religion instructs us to stop the injustice/oppression even if it against ourselves.
For us this is an issue of morality.
Quran 4:135
Sahih International
O you who have believed, be persistently standing firm in justice, witnesses for Allah , even if it be against yourselves or parents and relatives. Whether one is rich or poor, Allah is more worthy of both. So follow not [personal] inclination, lest you not be just. And if you distort [your testimony] or refuse [to give it], then indeed Allah is ever, with what you do, Acquainted.


Anas, may Allah be pleased with him, reported: “The Messenger of Allah undefined said: 'Help your brother, whether he is an oppressor or is oppressed.' A man asked: 'O Messenger of Allah! I (know how to) help him when he is oppressed, but how can I help him when he is an oppressor?' He undefined said: 'You can restrain him from committing oppression. That will be your help to him.'” [Al-Bukhari and Muslim]
This post was last modified: 08-28-2016, 02:10 AM by DesertRose1.

"Its better to walk alone, than with a crowd going in the wrong direction."
“O people, spread peace (extend greetings), feed the hungry, and pray at night when people are sleeping and you will enter Paradise in peace.”
[Sunan Ibn Majah 1334 (Sahih)]
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